Traffic light gridlock!

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DRIVERS going through red lights, motorists blocking driveways and children crossing between cars stopped on the pedestrian crossings were just some of the catalogue of issues raised about St James Road at this month’s meeting of Forfar Community Council.

Angus Councillor Glennis Middleton explained officers from the council’s education department had been monitoring the situation outside Strathmore Primary School, and their findings would be shared with representatives from the council’s roads department and Tayside Police at a forthcoming traffic management meeting.

She said residents of Reid Park Road can’t get out of their drives as motorists were parking over them or in the drive-ways, and drivers were also experiencing difficulties exiting Reid Park Road because of the level of traffic.

There were reports of motorists “jumping the lights” and driving through red lights when children were attempting to cross the road with the “green man”.

Community councillor Joe Harkin, who thought the situation would “calm down” when the West Port re-opens, praised the primary school’s teachers for taking groups of pupils and showing them how to use the crossings. However, councillor Middleton described the situation as “a disaster”, and whilst she had been informed the light sequences and timings were right, she had an issue with that.

She said: “Sometimes, if you are coming up the New Road, you catch a red light out of the corner of your eye. You’re not supposed to stop at that red light, because that’s for traffic on St James Road, but there are occasions that traffic from New Road stops, cars then follow each other and you have a row of traffic across St James Road, and then the lights change! The New Road traffic then can’t get round, and the St James Road traffic can’t get along.

“In the meantime, if there is gridlock and the children have pressed the button to cross, the children are then crossing between vehicles which is not good.” She added that, with the closure of the West Port, it was a “recipe for disaster.”