Tartan Day in Angus ends on a high note

20120407- Tartan Food and Craft Fair. 'Tartan Food & Craft Market & Tartan Parade, Carnoustie. General images of bikers, Pipe Band and general public on Carnoustie High Street and market in Three Halls. ''"Andy Thompson Photography", '"Copyright Andy Thompson Photography", '"No use without payment", '"www.atimages.com",

20120407- Tartan Food and Craft Fair. 'Tartan Food & Craft Market & Tartan Parade, Carnoustie. General images of bikers, Pipe Band and general public on Carnoustie High Street and market in Three Halls. ''"Andy Thompson Photography", '"Copyright Andy Thompson Photography", '"No use without payment", '"www.atimages.com",

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Following ten days of special events across the county, the Angus Tartan Day celebrations ended on a musical high note with pipe bands, Highland Dancing competitions, live music and a family ceilidh – and lots, lots more!

On Friday, April 6, one of the most memorable Tartan Day events took place.

At exactly 1.20 pm, onlookers were taken back to medieval times as Robert The Bruce and his nobles arrived at the mighty gates of Arbroath Abbey for Arbroath Abbey Timethemes’ reconstruction of the Signing of the Declaration of Arbroath on April 6, 1320.

On Saturday morning, Carnoustie & District Pipe Band marching along Carnoustie High Street, accompanied by The Saints’ Motorcycle Club Carnoustie, certainly drew the crowds into the town. “The Tartan Parade went very, very well,” said Kathleen Crowe of Carnoustie Business Association. “The piper playing on the back of a motorbike was a sight and sound to behold!

“In addition, the Tartan Food & Craft Market held in and around the Philip Hall proved highly popular.

“We were also delighted to be able to showcase local talent, with performances by Carnoustie’s award-winning brass band, Blazin’ Brass, and the event being opened by local piper Craig Weir, who also played at the ceilidh in the Kinloch with his Celtic rock band, Gleadhraich.”

One of the new events in this year’s Tartan Day programme was the Big Tartan Day Family Ceilidh Dance, which gave families the opportunity to enjoy a traditional Saturday night out while also raising funds for a local charity.

“Everyone had a great time, especially the children, who clearly loved the music and the dancing,” said Marco Agolini, one of the organisers of the Big Tartan Day Family Ceilidh Dance.

“Ceilidhs are a great way for people of all ages to come together socially and are a fabulous Scottish tradition.”

Tartan Day Scotland 2012 was sponsored by GlaxoSmithKline and, as the last of more than 50 Tartan Day events held in Angus came to an end, Provost Ruth Leslie Melville thanked the company for its sponsorship and also congratulated everyone who had contributed towards the success of this year’s celebrations.

“It’s wonderful how Tartan Day brings together the communities of Angus,” said the Provost.

“This is largely thanks to the many local people, organisations and businesses who work tirelessly behind the scenes of all the Tartan Day events that take place across Angus every year.

“On behalf of everyone who has attended one of these events, I’d like to say a very big thank you,” concluded the Provost.