Talk on beavers at Strathmore Primary

Bob Smith of the Scottish Wild Beaver Group shows a beaver skin and other items of interest to Some of the P5 class at Strathmore PS, Forfar. The pupils are from left: Elizabet Janakovica, Brandon Bricknell, Billy Lawson and Charlotte Bruce
Bob Smith of the Scottish Wild Beaver Group shows a beaver skin and other items of interest to Some of the P5 class at Strathmore PS, Forfar. The pupils are from left: Elizabet Janakovica, Brandon Bricknell, Billy Lawson and Charlotte Bruce

Pupils at Strathmore Primary School, Forfar, recently enjoyed a talk and visit from the Scottish Wild Beaver Group (SWBG).

During the Scottish Wild Beaver Group’s time at the school they explained to the children about beavers with information such as where they come from, where they live, what they like to eat and how they build dams.

They also explained to the children how beavers fit in with the wider eco-system and how the Scottish Wild Beaver Group can help if beavers come into conflict with people.

The interactive presentation from the Scottish Wild Beaver Group included a quiz, slides and video clips.

The children were able to feel a beaver pelt and see for themselves examples of sticks that the animals have gnawed.

The eager youngsters were also shown how to look out for signs of beaver habitats.

The education team at the Scottish Wild Beaver Group has recently given talks in several primary schools: Glamis, Meigle, Dunkeld, Rattray, Coupar Angus and Goodlyburn.

The children and teachers alike have been very enthusiastic to learn more about beavers in general, and the Tay beavers in particular.

One of the members is even preparing a beaver talk in Gaelic for P1 of the Breadalbane Gaelic medium school.

If any other school or community group would like a talk, please contact the Scottish Wild Beaver Group on01828 632992 or louise@bamff.co.uk.

The Scottish Wild Beaver Group is delighted to be working with the Tayside Beaver Study Group, the body formed by the Scottish Government, and Chaired by SNH to study the Tayside beaver population. At the moment the group is undertaking a sampling programme to establish the health and genetic status of the population. Traps have been set with the agreement of landowners and any beavers caught will be re-released at the place of capture after blood samples have been taken. Some of the beavers will be taken to the Royal Zoological Society of Scotland in Edinburgh for a more complex procedure that cannot be carried out in the field. They will be returned to the wild within the same day.

The Scottish Wild Beaver Group are also able to help protect trees. Anyone who has any beaver concerns can telephone 07766928525 for help and advice on beavers.

There is a free volunteer tree wrapping service for any farmer or gardener who has a valued tree close to a waterway with beavers.

The SWBG can wrap your tree in wire netting for you in such a way that it will protect the tree from beaver activity, but not harm the actual tree.

For more information on beavers in the local area visit scottishwildbeavers.org