More time online is leaving Scottish youngsters too tired to play

Many children across the country are no longer playing outside, preferring to stay indoors and take part in online activities instead.

Many children across the country are no longer playing outside, preferring to stay indoors and take part in online activities instead.

Many children across the country are no longer playing outside, preferring to stay indoors and take part in online activities instead.

This was the findings of new research carried out by British Military Fitness which also found that 19 per cent of two to three year olds say they are too tired to play.

Around 2000 youngsters aged between two and 12 were questioned about their activities on and offline to find out why children nowadays seem to have a lack in basic skills and why.

The results found: 38 per cent of two-three year old toddlers prefer to be indoors and online than play outside; 55 per cent of parents with two-three year olds say their child watches videos online for entertainment, the average toddler spends two hours a day watching videos, 68 per cent of children from Scotland can confidently manoeuvre around an Ipad, 66 per cent of Scottish children can confidently take a selfie, 55 per cent can confidently take a snapchat video and 65 per cent can confidently complete a level on Candy Crush.

However, the research also found one in three children from Scotland struggle to swim, 40 per cent of children struggle to ride a bike, 54 per cent cannot tie their shoe laces, 32 per cent struggle to read and 46 per cent cannot tell the time confidently.

It also seems children own more digital devices than traditional childhood toys as 61 per cent of children from Scotland own an iPad but sadly, one in three children in Scotland don’t own a teddy.

And 39 per cent own a mobile but a huge 71 per cent don’t have a hula hoop.

Garry Kerr, head of operations and training at British Military Fitness, said: “Trying to keep up with children aged 2-12 is usually exhausting.

“However when those aged two-three are complaining they are too tired to play, we know we have a problem on our hands.”